Understanding All the Types of Whiskey

Types of Whiskey

Bourbon whiskey – this type of whisky is made from at least 51% corn and must be stored in new charred American oak containers. It’s distilled to a maximum strength of 160 proof (80 percent alcohol by volume). The identity of the bourbon is not disclosed on the label, only its class or type.

Tennessee whiskey – similar to Kentucky straight bourbon but it has an additional requirement that the product also qualifies as Tennessee whiskeys if it meets all requirements except for aging time, typically five years, which makes it different than other bourbons.

Malt whiskey – these are produced throughout Scotland and Ireland using malted barley instead of grain mash; often peaty tasting with smoky characteristics.

Scotch Whiskey – these are made in Scotland and is made with malted barley and distilled twice in pot stills.

Irish Whiskey – these are also known as single malt whiskey or pure pot still whiskeys; most popular of which is Jameson Irish whiskey. Another distinction between Scottish whisky and Irish Whiskey, Scottish whiskies are typically combined before being bottled while Irish ones are not.

Rye Whiskey – rye-based bourbon that must be aged for at least two years but can have a higher percentage of rye content than many bourbons.

Single malt whiskey – this is a type of whiskey made at a single distillery, by using malted barley and only one pot still. Single malt scotch whiskies are available in many different flavours depending on the types of oak barrels used to age them.

Blended whiskey – this is composed of around 40–50% grain neutral spirits (GNS) or commonly referred to as alcohol distilled from fermented cereal grains with some whiskeys being more common than others; popular ones include Johnnie Walker Red Label which is mostly composed of corn spirit along with not less than 13 other ingredients including rye, wheat, bourbon etc.

Craft Whiskey – this a true artisan whiskey produced by small batch distillers, using hand-picked unique ingredients. Examples include The Lakes Whisky.

How to drink whiskey

Different types of whisky should be consumed in different way in order to get the best taste and flavour of each.

Single malt whiskey should be consumed neat with a few cubes of ice to be able to taste it at its best.
Blended whiskies are great for mixing as they can take other flavours quite well hence making them ideal for cocktails or simply enjoying over ice.
Non chill filtered whiskey usually gives you better flavours when consumed straight up without any additives or mixers though opinions do vary depending on who prefers what type of drams/drinks etc.
Rye whisky is best consumed neat as it can be a bit spicy and needs to be taken slowly.
Scotch whisky is best taken neat or on the rocks with just a splash of water to open up all its flavours.
Bourbon can be consumed neat or on the rocks and is best enjoyed with a little bit of water to allow for flavours to open up.
Irish whiskey can be consumed neat but needs time as its delicate flavour means it doesn’t need any mixers unless you want one – in which case go right ahead.

It is important that one understand the different types of whiskies before buying them or mixing them with other drinks or ingredients since some are not compatible with each other hence ruining the drink, cocktail etc. It is also advisable for those who want to make cocktails on their own at home to go through recipes first so they know what ingredients will work well together and which won’t.

What should you pair with your whiskey for the perfect evening?

Whiskey pairing is an important topic that should be discussed. There are many different types of whiskies available in the market, but it’s important to remember that not all go well with food. For example, if you want a whiskey to enhance your dining experience at a fancy restaurant or for pairing with any other type of meal such as breakfast or lunch, then choose lighter tasting ones like blends which don’t contain much peat. If you’re looking for something stronger and more intense on the palate however (such as those aged in sherry casks), these can be better paired with specific foods such as cheese platters without ruining the taste of what you’re eating.

The history behind Irish, Scottish, and American whiskeys

Ireland and Scotland have a long history in whiskey production, and most drinkers will be familiar with a few of the brands that have been around for several decades, such as Bushmills, Jameson’s, and Macallan. It all started when monks began distilling whiskey for medicinal purposes, and then the Irish spread that knowledge throughout Europe during the early Middle Ages. The Irish didn’t just bring their skills with them either; they also brought over barley seeds which helped to drive production forward because the low-quality grains were difficult to cultivate in most countries at this time.

The history behind American whiskeys however does not go as far back though there has been some recently unearthed documents that suggest George Washington (the first president) used corn instead of rye or other ingredients. American whiskey is also known for being very strong with a distinct flavour profile that has been shaped by the country’s origins as well as its distilling process which involves melting down maple sap to create sugar first before fermenting it into alcohol.