Maximize Your Marketing Buzz – Channel Your Communications Into One Integrated Marketing Plan

The concept of Integrated Communications stems from Integrated Marketing Plan, but taking it to a different level. Let’s just say this is the “Art” of marketing and Integrated Marketing Plan is the “Science” of it… Or put it another way, Integrated Communications is like the art of cooking, planning all the right ingredients to be put into the cooking pot. Integrated Marketing Plan is the reality check presenting you with a budget which restricts the amount of ingredients.

This is seen as a reality check for enthusiastic marketers with the planning phase allows you great creativity in applying your marketing mix. It helps you to apply your rational thoughts to justify your marketing spending. It helps you plan your budget by guiding you to match your financial and manpower resources, gives you a time line for achieving your goals and helps you monitor your progress.

Integrated Communications is a term which defines a concept which consolidates and reiterates through one focused & unified message across all the marketing mix of advertising, public relations, direct marketing as well as all marketing collaterals.

The concept works well for both the traditional as well as internet marketing. Large brick and mortar corporations will manage theirs via synchronizing their TV, radio & press ads, publicity with direct sales initiatives with one single message. Past experience suggested that great effort must be executed to ensure that all marketing mix activities are aligned throughout with one single message. This is especially so when the corporation is large and adopts a decentralized business model.

By contrast, with regards to Integrated Communications for Small business Internet Marketing, there seems to be lesser alignment problems. You can standardize and focus your keywords in your scripts, online display ads, emails, newsletters to enhance search results via Search Engine Optimization (SEO), do your social book-marking, networking and viral marketing all within your control.

Successful campaigns almost without fail (don’t mind the pun) consists of at least 4 aligned marketing tactics, namely extensive exposure advertisements, direct marketing, website, email marketing.

Hence, “Integrated” takes on a whole new meaning when you examine the various potential communications tools you can used, match it with your marketing budget plan, time it for implementation and review it over time for enhanced effectiveness. This effectively speaking, forms the Integrated Marketing Plan.

Understanding All the Types of Whiskey

Types of Whiskey

Bourbon whiskey – this type of whisky is made from at least 51% corn and must be stored in new charred American oak containers. It’s distilled to a maximum strength of 160 proof (80 percent alcohol by volume). The identity of the bourbon is not disclosed on the label, only its class or type.

Tennessee whiskey – similar to Kentucky straight bourbon but it has an additional requirement that the product also qualifies as Tennessee whiskeys if it meets all requirements except for aging time, typically five years, which makes it different than other bourbons.

Malt whiskey – these are produced throughout Scotland and Ireland using malted barley instead of grain mash; often peaty tasting with smoky characteristics.

Scotch Whiskey – these are made in Scotland and is made with malted barley and distilled twice in pot stills.

Irish Whiskey – these are also known as single malt whiskey or pure pot still whiskeys; most popular of which is Jameson Irish whiskey. Another distinction between Scottish whisky and Irish Whiskey, Scottish whiskies are typically combined before being bottled while Irish ones are not.

Rye Whiskey – rye-based bourbon that must be aged for at least two years but can have a higher percentage of rye content than many bourbons.

Single malt whiskey – this is a type of whiskey made at a single distillery, by using malted barley and only one pot still. Single malt scotch whiskies are available in many different flavours depending on the types of oak barrels used to age them.

Blended whiskey – this is composed of around 40–50% grain neutral spirits (GNS) or commonly referred to as alcohol distilled from fermented cereal grains with some whiskeys being more common than others; popular ones include Johnnie Walker Red Label which is mostly composed of corn spirit along with not less than 13 other ingredients including rye, wheat, bourbon etc.

Craft Whiskey – this a true artisan whiskey produced by small batch distillers, using hand-picked unique ingredients. Examples include The Lakes Whisky.

How to drink whiskey

Different types of whisky should be consumed in different way in order to get the best taste and flavour of each.

Single malt whiskey should be consumed neat with a few cubes of ice to be able to taste it at its best.
Blended whiskies are great for mixing as they can take other flavours quite well hence making them ideal for cocktails or simply enjoying over ice.
Non chill filtered whiskey usually gives you better flavours when consumed straight up without any additives or mixers though opinions do vary depending on who prefers what type of drams/drinks etc.
Rye whisky is best consumed neat as it can be a bit spicy and needs to be taken slowly.
Scotch whisky is best taken neat or on the rocks with just a splash of water to open up all its flavours.
Bourbon can be consumed neat or on the rocks and is best enjoyed with a little bit of water to allow for flavours to open up.
Irish whiskey can be consumed neat but needs time as its delicate flavour means it doesn’t need any mixers unless you want one – in which case go right ahead.

It is important that one understand the different types of whiskies before buying them or mixing them with other drinks or ingredients since some are not compatible with each other hence ruining the drink, cocktail etc. It is also advisable for those who want to make cocktails on their own at home to go through recipes first so they know what ingredients will work well together and which won’t.

What should you pair with your whiskey for the perfect evening?

Whiskey pairing is an important topic that should be discussed. There are many different types of whiskies available in the market, but it’s important to remember that not all go well with food. For example, if you want a whiskey to enhance your dining experience at a fancy restaurant or for pairing with any other type of meal such as breakfast or lunch, then choose lighter tasting ones like blends which don’t contain much peat. If you’re looking for something stronger and more intense on the palate however (such as those aged in sherry casks), these can be better paired with specific foods such as cheese platters without ruining the taste of what you’re eating.

The history behind Irish, Scottish, and American whiskeys

Ireland and Scotland have a long history in whiskey production, and most drinkers will be familiar with a few of the brands that have been around for several decades, such as Bushmills, Jameson’s, and Macallan. It all started when monks began distilling whiskey for medicinal purposes, and then the Irish spread that knowledge throughout Europe during the early Middle Ages. The Irish didn’t just bring their skills with them either; they also brought over barley seeds which helped to drive production forward because the low-quality grains were difficult to cultivate in most countries at this time.

The history behind American whiskeys however does not go as far back though there has been some recently unearthed documents that suggest George Washington (the first president) used corn instead of rye or other ingredients. American whiskey is also known for being very strong with a distinct flavour profile that has been shaped by the country’s origins as well as its distilling process which involves melting down maple sap to create sugar first before fermenting it into alcohol.

Why the New Direct Market Access Rule Was Implemented

Recent developments in the field of computer applications have seen trade at the US markets computerized. There were several benefits derived from this. Traders can conduct business and trade at the markets, selling and buying securities at the touch of a button. To access the trading floor, the exchange provided dealers with an access code that enables them log into the system and conduct trade as they please. The dealers and brokers are however registered and also bound by rules and regulations as provided by the SEC, or Securities and Exchange Commission.

Now, many dealer brokers have been allowing their clients and customers as well as other users to use the access code provided by the SEC to trade and conduct business on the bourse. This is often referred to as naked access.

The new rules as put forward by the Securities and Exchange Commission basically sought to tame this idea. Basically, it is unacceptable that traders who are not regulated and do not fall under the jurisdiction of the SEC can conduct business directly on the trading floor. The rule mainly seeks to bar orders placed directly by clients of brokerage firms to a securities exchange platform while using the MPID or market participant identifier issued to a broker or dealer.

The dealers and brokers are usually required to, and are expected to adhere to, laid down regulations. These regulations only apply to them and cannot extend to their clients. This is why the SEC is seeking to regulate direct market access. The new rule put forward by SEC, the exchange commission, seeks to have dealers and brokers put in place risk controls before providing their clients and customers direct market access.

While this rule is basically a US market rule and does not directly affect the Canadian markets, stock brokers and securities firms such as Canada’s TMX have operations and like other sell side dealers, will be affected. While TMX is a big shares trader with operations across the US, only sell side parties will be affected. However, normal trading operations on the US markets are expected to proceed as usual.

US-based dealers and brokers are faced with a difficult situation. The SEC requires that they come up with stringent yet effective rules and controls that will enable them regulate and supervise access to previously unfettered naked access or sponsored access to the markets via the provided MPID. This is especially important as they key is that risk controls will prevent trades that exceed set capital and credit thresholds.